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G.O.A.T. of the North: The Heir is Apparent

G.O.A.T. of the North: The Heir is Apparent

| September 17, 2020 | 0 Comments

Something truly consequential happened in Canadian basketball on Tuesday September 15, 2020. King Nash’s rightful heir to the G.O.A.T. of the North royal seat completed his most profound statement on the line of succession.[1] Jamal Murray, Kitchener, Ontario’s Own, completed a string of superlative performances against the Los Angeles Clippers (the “both ends of the […]

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Signs of the Times: COVID-19’s Impact on Business in Small City Ontario in Pictures

Signs of the Times: COVID-19’s Impact on Business in Small City Ontario in Pictures

| April 20, 2020 | 2 Comments

No one and nothing are left untouched by the COVID-19 pandemic. A well-distanced walk around a downtown business area in a small Ontario city delivers direct proof. Oshawa, the only “real” city in Durham Region, has a gritty rep. Its urban challenges are not fictional, but neither are its prospects for comprehensive renewal in its […]

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COVID-19 Offences in Ontario: Enforcing Orders in a Pandemic

COVID-19 Offences in Ontario: Enforcing Orders in a Pandemic

| March 31, 2020 | 0 Comments

When it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic, forget a dystopian future. The future is now. It is hard and growing morbidly harder every day. Governments abroad and at home have been asking us to stick with the program. Follow the advice of our public health officials. Draw upon our emotional intelligence to consider the impact […]

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Using Rhymes to Prove Crimes: “Murder Was the Case That They Gave Me”.…So Was Gun Possession, Drug Trafficking and Gang Association[1]

Using Rhymes to Prove Crimes: “Murder Was the Case That They Gave Me”.…So Was Gun Possession, Drug Trafficking and Gang Association[1]

| April 22, 2018 | 1 Comment

In Canada, there were 2,142,545 criminal violations in 2016.[2]More than half of those, 1,163,647, were property-related crimes like breaking and entering buildings, stealing vehicles worth more than $5000, shoplifting items valued at under $5000 and possessing stolen property.[3] Violent crimes represented a much smaller part of the Canadian crime picture totalling 381,594 or just under […]

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